Hollywood fuel fight: Mark Ruffalo vs. Adam Baldwin

http://twitter.com/#!/Ria_/status/214733903552970753

Hollywood meets fossil fuel!

Actor/director Mark Ruffalo jumped on the United Nations agenda bandwagon with these tweets.

Good Morn! Can you help us end fossil fuel subsidies? Pls tweet #endfossilfuelsubsidies TODAY to help us send a msg & spread the word.!!!”

— Mark Ruffalo (@MarkRuffalo) June 18, 2012

@MeeraGhani: @Mruff221 as a next step lets think about where this money could be better spent #endfossilfuelsubsidies#RenewableEnergy!

— Mark Ruffalo (@MarkRuffalo) June 18, 2012

@natrlgasguzzler @watercitizen The real solution is Wind Water and Solar. Natural Gas is as bad as any other fossil fuel and destroys water.

— Mark Ruffalo (@MarkRuffalo) June 18, 2012

Bless his heart. Dear Mr. Ruffalo: When you are on the side of Greenpeace nuts, you are doing it wrong.

Want to stop climate change? Stop funding it! #EndFossilFuelSubsidies

— Greenpeace (@Greenpeace) June 18, 2012

The hashtag was trending this morning as eco-nuts tweeted out messages to the Rio+20 United Nations Summit.

The easiest ask ever–pls join the #endfossilfuelsubsidies twitterstorm today. It's gone global very quickly–trending #2 a moment ago

— Bill McKibben (@billmckibben) June 18, 2012

The summit appears to be as irrelevant as its supporters.

(Reuters) – As Brazil welcomes nearly 120 heads of state and government for a summit on global development this week, the mood could not be more different than it was two decades ago, when global leaders gathered here for the landmark Earth Summit.

Back then, once-arcane concerns about climate change and deforestation had finally grabbed the world’s attention, leading to a global treaty on biodiversity and decisions that cleared the way for the Kyoto agreement on greenhouse gases.

Now, though, the minds of global leaders are elsewhere.

Instead of clean energy, food, the oceans and other topics scheduled for debate at Rio+20, as the summit is known, political focus is attuned to a teetering Europe, turmoil in the Middle East and a presidential campaign in the United States.

Actor Adam Baldwin is not a fan of what he calls this anti-American propaganda campaign. So, he decided to fight propaganda with truth.

https://twitter.com/adamsbaldwin/status/214756305527783425

https://twitter.com/adamsbaldwin/status/214757287305297920

https://twitter.com/adamsbaldwin/status/214749669195128832

https://twitter.com/adamsbaldwin/status/214761308946571265

https://twitter.com/adamsbaldwin/status/214758959213576194

Boom. And then began the counter hashtag #endethanolsubsidies.

https://twitter.com/adamsbaldwin/status/214734589061640195

@adamsbaldwin 1day we'll look back on using food 4 fuel > save climate as we look at human sacrifice to please the gods #EndEthanolSubsidies

— mark (@ratPack66) June 18, 2012

We burn our food for fuel! Historians will refer to us as… idiots! #EndEthanolSubsidies

— Fedup w/POTUS (@dcarney321) June 18, 2012

https://twitter.com/BrandonSFrazer/status/214740996574031874

Silly Politicians, Corn is for Food! #EndEthanolSubsidies

— Dedicated Tenther (@Dedicated10ther) June 18, 2012

Hashtag box office results? Win for Mr. Baldwin. Plus, he’s way easier on the eyes. Are we right, ladies?

Read more: http://twitchy.com/2012/06/18/hollywood-fuel-fight-mark-ruffalo-and-endfossilfuelsubsidies-vs-adam-baldwin-and-endethanolsubsidies/

He Turned This Ugly Cargo Van Into An Awesome Home On Wheels

For years, Instructables user had a dream to overhaul a Sprinter cargo van. This dream came at a price, though. He booked a trip from Portland, Oregon, to the East Coast where he was finally able to purchase the exact Sprinter model that he had always dreamed of.

With the van in his possession, in order to transform the vehicle from drab to fab, he first needed to gut the entire interior. In just over six months, was able to remodel his 2006 Sprinter into an RV ready for nomadic inhabiting.

loves to engineer and create new designs in CAD, so it only made sense that he would use the program to map out his new RV.

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With the layout finalized, he was able to break up chunks of the design, such as the cabinetry, into smaller pieces, making it easier to produce a materials list.

He found a professional to insulate the inside of the van. The catch? He had to complete all the prep work himself.

He masked out the cab and floor with painter’s plastic.

He then taped off areas where he was planning on attaching paneling.

The insulation work took just over 15 minutes and was almost instantly dry to the touch.

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Then it was time to get to the meat of the van — he used a pre-finished piece of baltic birch plywood for paneling.

The plywood was flexible enough to bend to the curve of the van’s interior.

The flooring went in and things were finally looking homey.

Assembling the cabinets took a lot of patience — there were A LOT of pieces.

He assembled the cabinets in his garage and then transferred them into the van.

He started the installation with the upper cabinets and worked his way down.

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The cabinets came together rather quickly thanks to the precision of the CNC used to cut the pieces.

The birch cabinets were already pre-finished on both sides and therefore required very little attention after installation.

Making It There knew that he would be living out of the van for an extended period of time, so he wanted to make sure that when it came to cooking, he wouldn’t have to sacrifice much.

His design included a working oven and a kitchen sink. He also made the decision to house the propane and water tanks inside the van under the oven.

To save water, he installed a foot pedal and a hand pump.

His decision to house the water tanks inside the locker stemmed from not wanting the water to get too hot or too cold during summer and winter.

He created custom roof pods to house larger camping accessories like chairs and picnic tables.

The pods can be opened from both sides of the van, for easy access.

They were designed with energy efficiency in mind and reinforced with extra polymetal protection.

Two 100-watt solar panels solved their need for electricity.

And finally the van was ready!

The interior looks a lot roomier than you would expect.

Just your average kitchen-living room hybrid.

No need for a tent on this camping trip, this RV has a comfortable bed spread.

Now the first question that comes to my mind, is where are they going to go to the bathroom?


If you want to embark on your own RV project, check out all the instructions from this one here.

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/cargo-van-revival/

These 4 breathtaking islands have found amazing ways to make their own natural energy.

Located off the grid? How about making your own?

Islands are their own little worlds. It’s part of their awesomeness. But being cut off from the mainland can also be a serious challenge. Larger land mass means more space and more people … and that usually means more support for roads, electricity, cable lines, and all the other technological amenities of modern living.

But just because you’re surrounded by water doesn’t mean you have to be stuck in the Stone Age. In fact, the inconvenience of connecting back to a mainland-based power grid might just provide the motivation to find an alternative solution like it did for these four islands that found sustainable ways to make their own independent energy.

1. Sams, Denmark

The island of
Sams is located off the central-east coast of Denmark in the Kattegat sea. It’s about 44 square miles in area with a population of around 4,000 people and has been functioning on 100% self-sustainable wind- and biomass-generated electricity since about 2007. In fact, they’ve reached the point where they’re producing so much clean electricity that they’re able to export their surplus.

They also have a
cool interactive map that shows how their renewable energy system works.


Sams photo by David Huang/Flickr.

2. El Hierro

Samso used to have support from the Danish government and was connected to the mainland power grid. But the remote island nation of El Hierro wasn’t so lucky. An autonomous community of Spain located in the Canary Islands off the coast of Africa, El Hierro
used to ship in diesel fuel from the mainland to power their electric grid.

But in the summer of 2014, they started to break away by constructing a new wind- and water-turbine farm. The $110 million plant is on track to provide 100% of the island’s electricity by the end of 2015.


El Hierro photo by Jose Mesa/Flickr.

3. Tokelau

In addition to being the
free domain host for my very first personal website back in 2003, the tiny Pacific island of Tokelau (population: 1,400!) also has the distinction of being the first almost-nation to run entirely on solar power.

If we’re being technical, Tokelau is still designated as a
non-self-governing territory of New Zealand, according to the United Nations. But the installation of this solar grid was actually part of the long-term plan to end Tokelau’s dependence on New Zealand and establish themselves as a fully independent and self-governing entity.


Tokelau photo by Cloud Surfer / Wikimedia Commons.

4. Kodiak Island, Alaska

The residential electricity rate in Alaska in June 2015 was nearly the highest in the U.S. and 63% higher than the national average, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Even though places like Kodiak Island were already relying on hydropower for 80% of their electricity, they were still burning millions of gallons of diesel fuel each year.

But with a little help from the Alaska Energy Authority,
the second largest island in the United States now gets
99.7% of its energy from wind and hydro. Which, sure, might not be exactly 100%. But considering the fact that their goal was to reach 95% renewable energy by 2020, I’d say 99.7% by 2015 is pretty good. (Alaska as a whole aims to reach 50% renewable energy by 2025.)


Kodiak Island photo by Wanetta Ayers / Wikimedia Commons.

And while these other islands aren’t quite there yet, they have plans to become self-sufficient and sustainable by 2050:

Hawaii

In June 2015 just ahead of President Obama’s announcement of the Clean Power Plan
Gov. David Ige of Hawaii committed his island-that’s-a-state to achieving the goal of 100% renewable power by 2045. Two months later, they opened the first fully closed-cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion plant in the U.S.

This is a particularly good idea for Hawaii, which
couldn’t even harvest its own fossil fuels if it wanted to.


Hawaii photo by Xklaim/Wikimedia Commons.

Marshall Islands

A Pacific island nation in
free association with the United States, the Republic of Marshall Islands also released a new plan for an eco-friendly future, starting in the summer of 2015. This tiered plan aims for them to reduce carbon emissions 45% by 2030 with the ultimate goal of achieving zero emissions by 2050.


Marshall Islands photo by Stefan Lins/Flickr.

The country’s minister of foreign affairs, Tony de Drum, said it best in the
press release announcing this initiative: “Our message is simple: If one of the world’s smallest, poorest and most geographically isolated countries can do it, so can you.

Sometimes a little competition is all it takes. Let’s hope the rest of the world accepts the challenge.

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/these-4-breathtaking-islands-have-found-amazing-ways-to-make-their-own-natural-energy?c=

This incredible art project in Paris uses heartbeats to plant trees. Here’s how.

Plenty of folks have seen the Eiffel Tower.


And it’s certainly a sight to see on any occasion.

But until Sunday night, no one had seen it quite like this…

All GIFs via Here Now/YouTube.

In dazzling fashion, images and graphics were projected onto the tower the day before COP21 began in Paris.

The installation lit up the sky with its forest theme on Nov. 29, 2015, a day ahead of COP21 (that’s short for the Conferences of Parties), the United Nations’ climate change summit, which runs through Dec. 4.

The project, titled “1 Heart 1 Tree” and created by artist Naziha Mestaoui, is aimed at drawing attention to the conference and encouraging leaders to (wake up and) set ambitious goals to reduce carbon emissions.

Photo courtesy of 1 Heart 1 Tree, used with permission.

The best part? You can be part of Mestaoui’s creation.

By downloading an app and using its sensor to monitor your heartbeat, the pumping of your heart will create a growing “branch” on the tower’s tree. (How freaking cool is that?!) You can view it in the app on your phone and share with friends on social media.

But that’s not all. Through the project’s partnered reforestation programs, app users also purchase an actual tree to be planted when they buy a virtual one for the tower. So far, the app has ensured about 50,000 trees will be planted because of “1 Heart 1 Tree.”

“I created this installation so that people everywhere can realize what is possible if we come together,” Mestaoui said in a speech on Sunday, according to a press release provided to Upworthy.

“We can protect and regrow our forests, we can tap the natural powers of the sun, the wind, the earth and the sea, and we can build a safer future if we go 100% clean energy for everyone.”

COP21 is a truly historic event one that could actually spark a major shift in the fight against climate change.

Leaders from more than 150 countries around the world have gathered in Paris to nail down the specifics as to how each can do its fair share to cut way back on carbon emissions.

It’s the largest gathering of heads of state ever.

The end goal is to reduce the world’s collective carbon footprint to ensure global temperatures don’t exceed 2 degrees Celsius of what they were before the industrial revolution of the late-1700s. Because, as climate science tells us, that would be absolutely awful.

The conference is just starting but, so far, news out of the summit seems promising.

For starters, take the summit’s guest list (practically) the whole world is seriously committed to fighting climate change. That includes major polluters, like the U.S., India, China, and Russia.

Also, news of Bill Gates’ multibillion-dollar initiative to unite the world with clean energy investments is already making waves as a game-changing strategy to make our energy sources greener while also helping eradicate poverty in the developing world.

Basically, it’s a huge win-win.

“1 Heart 1 Tree” serves as a powerful reminder that the beauty of art can have an immeasurable impact.

Lighting up The Eiffel Tower won’t stop climate change on its own but it can inspire the hearts and minds of those who are dedicated to trying their best.

Check out incredible footage of “1 Heart 1 Tree” below:

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/this-incredible-art-project-in-paris-uses-heartbeats-to-plant-trees-heres-how?c=tpstream

We could be saving a lot of money by living a cleaner, greener lifestyle — like in the trillions.

Look, I get it: Cleaning up your carbon footprint feels like a lot of work.

What with all the dividing up your plastics and cans and cardboard and glass and dragging that bright green or blue bin out to the curb once a week.

Hell, I’m not even sure what goes where at my co-working space:

Is there a difference between the blue and the green? What about all the biodegradable cups and utensils? Where do I put those when I’m done? I’M SO OVERWHELMED ooooh, look! Reese’s Peanut Butter Pumpkins…

And sure, maybe you’d buy an electric car if there were more options or if they weren’t so much more expensive at the lot.

But as cool as your neighbor’s solar panels look, you can’t imagine that the maintenance and installation costs could really make it worth it. Besides, your standard electric bill is easier, and it’s not even that bad anyway. Right?

But what if I told you that clean, green living will actually save you money?

GIF from “The Matrix.”

I think it’s fair to assume that most people think that
greenhouse gases are cheap and easy, so they’re willing to go along with the undeniable damage that they do to the planet because, hey, money’s tight. I get that.

But guess who benefits from that belief? (Hint: It’s
the people making money off of it.)

As it turns out, renewable energy is significantly more cost-effective than fossil fuels.

And the price is only going down (which in turn makes the price of fossil fuels rise even more because the market says so shout-out to all my free-market capitalist homies!)

Clearly Beyonc was singing about renewal energy and the changing climate, which is decidedly not “chill.” GIF via Destiny’s Child.

So much so that it has cost us over $300 trillion and counting! for not doing the green thing.

A new economic study has valued the cost of our continued environmental destruction at a whopping $326 trillion dollars (over two centuries, but still).

Specifically, the study from the University of Cambridge and the
National Snow and Ice Data Center applied theoretical economic models to predict the cost of climate change over the next 185 years on agriculture, air conditioning (to counter the rising global temperatures), human health care and medical coverage for new and evolving diseases, and more.

What’s more, their model showed that if we don’t find a way to slow the increasing thaw of Arctic permafrost and the resulting carbon emissions, it’ll add an additional $43 trillion to that already hefty sum.

It should be noted that these numbers are ignoring the cost of inflation; presumably private colleges will cost $43 trillion per semester in the year 2100, but that’s like comparing a nickel today to a nickel in 1830.

GIF from “Eastbound and Down.”

“We want to use these models to help us make better decisions linking scientific and economic models together is a way to help us do that,” Chris Hope, one of the authors of the paper, said in a press release. Ya know, better decisions like not destroying the planet while also paying out of pocket to subsidize our own demise.

At the end of the day, the facts are clear: Clean, green living is not a partisan problem. It’s actually better for everyone.

“Reducing fossil fuel emissions and stopping climate change is not a stark choice between jobs and the environment,” said Kevin Schaefer, another author of the paper. Rather, we can simultaneously reduce emissions and grow the economy by harnessing the same market forces that created the problem in the first place. […] This will create an environment where consumers will naturally choose the low-carbon option because it is the best economic choice available.”

When you put it that way, it’s kind of hard to argue. It is literally a win-win for everyone.

GIF from “Parks and Recreation.”

The return on investment for clean energy is worth it but the benefits are that much better when we all work together.

Time for some real talk: One electric car or residential solar panel is not going to save us from the $326 trillion doom of our fiery future.

But if the world around us keeps going about things as they have been, these small pockets of change will only serve to slightly offset the inevitable particularly when about 30% of the greenhouse gas emissions on the planet come from factories (including their share of emissions from electricity) the largest contributor of any sector.

So as long as money talks, let’s put our money where our mouths are and invest it in cleaner, greener lifestyles.

Let’s pledge our support for a clean energy future we can start by putting a stop to offshore drilling in the Arctic. By coming together and pledging ourselves toward a better future, we can implement greater and more far-reaching changes than me trying to understand the difference between the green and blue recycling bins.

But I’m still going to do that, of course. Because it still makes a difference.

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/we-could-be-saving-a-lot-of-money-by-living-a-cleaner-greener-lifestyle-like-in-the-trillions?c=tpstream

Ellen never gave up on her dreams. And our dream for the Earth isn’t unrealistic either.

It takes guts to dream big.

Because when you’re willing to take a stand, it means you actually care about something. And it’s scary to be open like that. It means placing a part of yourself on the line. It’s easier to give in to doubts or peer pressure. To hide.

But we’ve always loved the people who weren’t willing to settle. The dreamers.

We look up to them because they’ve felt what we’ve felt in every job interview, or school application, or confession of love they felt those same doubts and beat them back. They’re the people who inspire us to do what seems impossible.

But, what if Gandhi had gotten cold feet?

Image via Don’t Panic London/YouTube.

What if Ellen DeGeneres had stage fright?


Could the world really be powered by completely renewable sources? “There are a lot of people who say it is not possible,” Stanford professor Mark Jacobson told Upworthy. He’s out to prove them wrong.

Jacobson and his team weren’t involved in Don’t Panic’s video, but they have created a road map to 100% clean energy for 139 individual countries. Jacobson used today’s energy data projected forward to 2050 and customized the plan for each country based on their natural resources.

Volcanic Iceland, for example, could use a lot of geothermal, while sunny Italy could get more than half of their power from solar plants.


“In the end we’ll have a system that’s a lot cleaner, a lot safer, and our society should be more stable,” he added.

But to achieve this, we still need the same determination and heart that Gandhi and King had.

From Nov. 30 to Dec. 11, 2015, world leaders will be meeting in Paris to try to finally solve the climate change crisis.

We need to show them that we’re ready to dream big.

Watch Don’t Panic’s full video here:

The Wilderness Society also has a dream to keep southern Australia’s Great Australian Bight pristine and free of deep-sea oil rigs. Sign their petition to keep BP at bay and protect this untouched stretch of marine wilderness.

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/ellen-never-gave-up-on-her-dreams-and-our-dream-for-the-earth-isnt-unrealistic-either?c=tpstream

I Sold Everything, Bought An Airstream And Travel America With My Family Indefinitely

I’ve always been the person to tell people to chase their dreams, so I decided to take my own advice. My dream is to make a living as a professional photographer while travelling America and this is how I’m making it happen!

We sold our house, cars, most of our possessions and bought a 30ft Airstream that we could all live in comfortably. It wasn’t an easy decision and we were faced with a lot of doubts, but when we told other people what we were doing, their eyes lit up and I could see we were doing the right thing.

We’ve been permanently in the Airstream for a little over 3 months now and life has been an adventure!

Life on the road is not for everyone, but I wish someone would have told me when I was 21 years old, that you could buy an Airstream and live in it while seeing America! So, here I am now, telling you it’s possible. If I’m doing it with my wife and 4 year old son, you can definitely do it as a younger single person looking for adventure in your life!

I’ve always been the person to tell people to chase their dreams, so I decided to take my own advice


My dream is to make a living as a professional landscape photographer while travelling America and this is how I’m making it happen!


We sold our house, cars, most of our possessions and bought a 30ft Airstream that we could all live in comfortably


But when we told other people what we were doing, their eyes lit up and I could see we were doing the right thing


What most people want to know, is how do I make money on the road?


Well, I’m an established professional wedding photographer in Nashville TN and I make enough to stay out on the road and live this Airstream lifestyle of ours


I hope to eventually make all my income from landscape photography, selling prints and traveling America


But it’s going to take some time to make that transition


For now, I do what I need to pay our bills and make it happen


We’ve been permanently in the Airstream for a little over 3 months now and life has been an adventure


Yes, there were some tough times in the beginning as we adjusted to this new lifestyle, but we’re getting use to it now


We spend a lot of time boondocking (camping in the middle of nowhere) and it’s one of the coolest things you can experience in an Airstream


Plus it doesn’t cost you anything


One of my favorite places so far has been Big Bend National Park in Texas


The night sky gets so dark that you can almost see every star in the sky


If you let your eyes adjust long enough, you will eventually see the milky way, that’s how dark it is


We charged our batteries every day by using our solar panels on top of the Airstream


We still had amazing internet service through our phones, so we were able to do Instagram and all that fun stuff


We hiked some amazing locations that challenged our endurance as a family hiking together


But one of the most amazing thing we did was spend time in a natural hot spring that sat on the side of the Rio Grande river


Life on the road is not for everyone


But I wish someone would have told me when I was 21 years old, that you could buy an Airstream and live in it while seeing America


So, here I am now, telling you it’s possible


If I’m doing it with my wife and 4 year old son


You can definitely do it as a younger single person looking for adventure in your life


Everyday is a new adventure


And I hope it continues for along time

Read more: http://www.boredpanda.com/sold-house-family-travels-america-airstream-photography-joe-hendricks/